Fairy Houses

fairy

Today, I’m passing the website over to my darling oldest daughter who is a professional Fairy House Builder. If you have any children that love fairies, magical creatures, and getting creative, then building a fairy house might just be up their alley.

 

Hello! First I’ll start with how I got creative and into making fairy houses. It all started when my seventh birthday rolled around and my Nana and Grandpa gave me a clay fairy house, a tiny (fairy-sized) fence, metal fairy-sized watering can, bench, and tiny bird (or bug) house. When the temperature warmed up (since my birthday is in late winter), my sister, my Nana and I went to the pond to get some stones, sticks and cement chunks. Bit by bit, I worked on my fairy house when I wanted and could. I even got some fairy plants!

MATERIALS

Fairy houses can be built out of almost anything found in nature. Here are some of my favourite things to use:

  • sticks/twigs
  • stones
  • popsicle sticks
  • dandelion stems
  • leaves
  • grass
  • mulch
  • dirt
  • flowers
  • sand
  • pebbles
  • store-bought houses or fairy furniture
  • pine cones

HOW TO BUILD

  1. Find a good spot in your backyard, not near a lawnmower, hidden from animals that will destroy it [mom says: give your kids a spot in your flower or vegetable garden that you don't mind being dug up over and over. Mark out their space vs. your space and don't cross the magic line. Other spaces could be found in large flower bins or pots, like the ones from Costco, or old sandboxes/water tables that they've outgrown]
  2. Start with a floor made of pine needles or twigs or pebbles or something that you found. You can build around it, make sure you leave space for the door. Use twigs and mud or make a leafy tent. Make it as big as you can.
  3. You can make a straw or grass roof.
  4. Make it fun for the fairies with special features. Some ideas are: a garden, a hammock, a swing set, fire pit [mom says: not a real fire pit! Fairies don't like fire and neither do moms], a pool, a bridge, and any other thing you can think of. Fairies LOVE a little bling don’t they? Shiny stones, shells, or even feathers might really do the trick to getting a curious fairies attention!!

 

 

 

Sock Walk

sock walk

Earth Day is this week and so we are bringing you some more fun things to do to get your kids out in nature and thinking about their planet.

A Sock Walk is a great way to get kids thinking about native plants (and weeds!) in their environment: where they come from, how they spread,and how they grow. It’s a step up from the classic bean plant that kids grow in the elementary school years when they’re learning about seeds.

WHAT YOU NEED

1 sock per person

1 Ziploc baggie per sock OR one pot of dirt per sock

HOW TO DO IT

Head on down to your laundry room and grab a couple of those single socks whose mates have just disappeared forever or the socks with the huge holes you keep planning on mending (but never will).

Head out to your nearest park, field, overgrown meadow, forest or wooded area, Environmentally Significant Area (ESA) or any other place that is growing naturally and wildly.

Slip a sock over one of your shoes and have your kids do the same.

Walk around until your socks get good and dirty. Be sure to walk through any areas with plants growing (but safely! Don’t crush anything and stay on the path when required!).

Take off your socks carefully, turn them inside out to keep anything stuck to the sock safe.

When you get home, turn your sock right-side-in and put it either in your Ziploc baggie or in your pot of dirt and lightly cover it with more dirt.

Spray your sock with water in the baggie or water your pot.

Tape your baggie to a sunny window/place your pot on a warm, sunny window sill.

WHAT WILL HAPPEN

Wait a week or two and see what grows. Make sure you keep watering your sock as needed. If you have picked up any seeds along your way, your socks will sprout!