Plant a Row, Grow a Row

plantarowgrowarow

Gardeners, green-thumbs, and wannabes, as you are planning and/or planting your summer garden this weekend, consider London’s Plant a Row, Grow a Row Campaign. Founded in 2012 this program encourages you to plant a little bit extra in your garden and to donate that extra produce to the London Food Bank.

DID YOU KNOW?

The London Food Bank is able to easily collect and distribute non-perishables, but low income individuals/families also need the most important part of our diet: fresh fruit and vegetables. While you can imagine the obvious trouble with collecting such items in a drop off bin at a grocery store, they are able to collect and distribute fresh produce when it is brought directly to them.

PLANT A ROW, GROW A ROW

This time of year is the absolute easiest way to contribute to your London Food Bank by making space in your kitchen garden for a bit more produce. Did you grow more zucchini than you can handle? Decide kale is just not your thing? Have more tomatoes than you can can? Rhubarb running wild? Had enough beets for one season? Bring your excess to the London Food Bank! Either make the conscious decision to over-plant or just bring them whatever you don’t want. Pick it at it’s prime and get it to the Food Bank ASAP.

SEEDS

If altruism isn’t motivation enough to get on board with this, Plant a Row, Grow a Row has received a whole lot of seeds to give to you at no cost! Bush beans, pole beans, leaf lettuce, spinach, summer squash, cucumber, kale and beets are available for your garden. Just plant, grow, keep what you want and donate the rest back. See Facebook for more information.

 

 

 

Sock Walk

sock walk

Earth Day is this week and so we are bringing you some more fun things to do to get your kids out in nature and thinking about their planet.

A Sock Walk is a great way to get kids thinking about native plants (and weeds!) in their environment: where they come from, how they spread,and how they grow. It’s a step up from the classic bean plant that kids grow in the elementary school years when they’re learning about seeds.

WHAT YOU NEED

1 sock per person

1 Ziploc baggie per sock OR one pot of dirt per sock

HOW TO DO IT

Head on down to your laundry room and grab a couple of those single socks whose mates have just disappeared forever or the socks with the huge holes you keep planning on mending (but never will).

Head out to your nearest park, field, overgrown meadow, forest or wooded area, Environmentally Significant Area (ESA) or any other place that is growing naturally and wildly.

Slip a sock over one of your shoes and have your kids do the same.

Walk around until your socks get good and dirty. Be sure to walk through any areas with plants growing (but safely! Don’t crush anything and stay on the path when required!).

Take off your socks carefully, turn them inside out to keep anything stuck to the sock safe.

When you get home, turn your sock right-side-in and put it either in your Ziploc baggie or in your pot of dirt and lightly cover it with more dirt.

Spray your sock with water in the baggie or water your pot.

Tape your baggie to a sunny window/place your pot on a warm, sunny window sill.

WHAT WILL HAPPEN

Wait a week or two and see what grows. Make sure you keep watering your sock as needed. If you have picked up any seeds along your way, your socks will sprout!